SOPA Protests are Happening, Here are a few

SOPA Protests are Happening, Here are a few

by January 18, 2012

Make sure you take action

News today has been dominated by SOPA – the Stop Online Piracy Act – with websites across the United States and the wider world joining a blackout to protest against the Act. Below are a list of major players that are participating in the protest.

Wikipedia.org: The world’s largest encyclopedia had no hesitation in protesting against SOPA. Heading to the English portion of the website causes a redirection to a small page titled “Imagine a World Without Free Knowledge”, with links to make your voice heard and to find out more about the bill. If you’re still confused, make sure to check out our tangent.

Reddit.com: Reddit is perhaps one of the greatest websites for having an open community that often provides golden material of great value, and is often incredibly helpful. Again highlighting the damage SOPA and PIPA – the Protect IP Act – would do if passed, visitors are being encouraged to take action by making a call to their local representative or/and signing a petition. If you haven’t done any of these, do them. Now.

Google.com: Arguably the one location that will have the most visits across the United States during the blackout period, Google have blacked out their logo in emphatic fashion. Considering you can search for anything and everything on Google, would this be the first website to fall prey to SOPA and PIPA?

WordPress.com: Do you know what platform we’re writing through? That’s right – WordPress. The blogging platform have blacked out every theme that users can usually browse and use. A stark reminder that the blogosphere could be heavily hit by the bills.

Mozilla.com: One of the world’s most popular internet browsers has joined the protest. After all, what’s the point of browsing the internet if you can’t have a solid browser to do it with?

Minecraft.net: The gaming phenomenon, that topped 20 million users this week, has blacked out its site and again encourages you to take action whether inside or outside of the US. Minecraft is one of the greatest recent examples of how the internet has fostered a community and allowed it to grow, with videos like this providing genuinely jaw-dropping moments.

Craigslist.org: trying to sell something in the US today? Need it removed quickly? Well, be aware: Craigslist wants you know how its future could potentially be threatened.

Sonicretro.org: Even Sonic the Hedgehog and Dr Robotnik have put their differences aside to protest against SOPA, and you can understand why: the world’s largest Sonic the Hedgehog database would be heavily infringed by SOPA and PIPA. Whatever you feelings towards Sonic Retro, that would be wrong.

That’s a few of the major websites. There are more – a lot more. Chances are you will come across them sometime today.